Conduct Your Life with a Healthy Heart

What Do Autumn Leaves, 60s Bra Burners, and Orchestra Conductors Have in Common? Read On!

Marlenea La Shomb, N.D., LMT
September – October 2021 • Vol 3, No 117

Aother autumn has made it to our doorstep, and with it clearer skies, and all the wonders of a changing season, along with its chores, and pumpkin everything! As we harvest our end-of-summer bounty, we ready our gardens for a long winter’s rest. These chores, like raking leaves, stacking firewood, and cleaning out the garden, are very healthy for your heart. Since everyone can benefit from a healthy heart, especially into our later years, I decided to look into it.

Simply put, here’s how it works: Our cells collectively make up organs; each organ has a meridian (energy pathway) that flows through it. Movement creates that energy and the heart meridian moves through the arms. So, moving the arms produces an energized and healthy heart—think swimming, dancing, power walking, sweeping, and Chi Gong. You get the idea.

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Sun “Kissed” and Heaven Sent—

The Delicious Versatility of Citrus Peels

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
May – June 2021 • Vol 3, No 115

All fruits are sun-kissed, yet the citrus family comes in right at the top in terms of the needed hours of sunlight to grow an abundance of juicy fruits. Mostly eaten raw, we juice lemons, limes, oranges and grapefruits, and we zest the peels. Lemon juice is a wonderfully healthy replacement for vinegar in salad dressings. My mom’s and my favorite jam has always been orange marmalade, made from the sour-orange rind.

It wasn’t until I studied the use of food from other countries, in this case citrus, that I realized how much we throw away that other cultures find uses for. Years ago,
I learned that the pith (the chewy, white part under the skin) is a main source for rutin.

Rutin is a bioflavonoid that is found in apples, buckwheat, most citrus fruits, figs, and both black and green tea. It has powerful antioxidant properties. It also helps your body produce collagen and utilize vitamin C. It is included in more than 130 therapeutic, medicinal preparations, and by itself, offers a number of health benefits, such as: Helps blood circulation, prevents blood clots, lowers cholesterol, reduces arthritis pain, and even heals bruising. [Healthline.com]

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2021-05-10T13:43:36-06:00Fitness & Nutrition|

Food Is Mood

How to Change Your Mood and Skip the Food!

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
March – April 2021 • Vol 3, No 114

“What?” you say, “How can food be mood? That’s rude!” Well, ask yourself this question: “Do I crave different foods depending on my mood?” Most of us would answer, “Oh, yeah.” So how does that work? Let me remind you that we are sunlight-activated, chemical/hormonal, and electrical beings!

The chemistry of food interacts with our body’s chemistry, its thoughts and feelings. Emotions activate different hormones. When you eat a banana, you don’t become the banana—the banana becomes you. This is the job of the liver. Keep in mind that food is much more than nutrients, fiber and protein—all the things we normally hear about. It provides life- and light-giving energy. I like the feeling of being light on my feet. I choose to eat a heavy meal when I’m ready to roll over and have a siesta! My grandson used to call it a food coma.

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Summer Savory

Enjoy this Flavorful Herb!

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
November-December 2020 • Vol 3, No 112

Summer savory (Satureja hortensis) grows well in the mountains of Montana. It is deer-resistant and it thrives in most soil types and weather conditions. There are about 14 species of this highly aromatic herb, but you can only find the seeds for the two of them. Summer savory is an annual in the same family as the perennial, winter savory. Savory leaves were formerly used to cure bee and wasp stings. Both summer and winter savory can be propagated from seeds sown in April. The seeds are very slow in germinating. The early spring seedlings are often topped off for fresh use in June. When the plants are in flower, they may be pulled up and dried for winter use.

This herb has lilac tubular flowers that bloom in the northern hemisphere from July to September. It grows to around 1–2 feet in height and has very slender, bronze-green leaves. Summer savory is a traditional popular herb in Atlantic Canada and Europe, where it is used in the same way that sage is in the west.

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2020-11-01T11:52:34-07:00Barefoot Gardening/Gourmet Herbalist|

Five Simple Changes

From Natural-Health Pioneer Dr. Rashid Buttar

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
November-December 2020 • Vol 3, No 112

Dr. Rashid Buttar is a best-selling author and a natural-health activist. He ranks among the top-50 doctors in the U.S. and has treated thousands of patients with life-threatening conditions in over 92 countries. He is the creator of the medical-assessment program called, “The Map to Get AHEAD™” (see page two), which stands for “Advanced Health Evaluation and Assessment for Detoxification.”

As the first steps toward wellness, he recommends these five simple lifestyle habits. He assures us that they will produce improved sleep, increased energy, and better bowel movements, while enhancing focus, concentration and an overall sense of well-being—all in 30 days. These steps are part of what I’ve been recommending in my practice and in my articles in this magazine for years. Why not give these simple changes a try and see what they will do for you?

1) EXERCISE
Move your body every day. Start walking, if nothing else, and increase your time/steps every day. Goal is to walk 2-to-2.5 miles a day.

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Wild Edibles!

Right in Your Own Back Yard

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
September-October 2020 • Vol 3, No 111

Parents are always looking for a fun way to engage their children, especially in these times. I came across the Wild Food Homeschool Teaching Guide, by Linda Runyon, from the Wild Food Company (OffTheField.com). Linda writes: “Over my decades of teaching about wild food, I’ve noticed that people who become interested in learning it often have two reactions — one right after the other. First, there are many who had no idea that FREE, tasty nutrition is available everywhere, right under their nose. Second, wheels start turning in their minds as they realize that they have come upon information that practically guarantees that they and their loved ones need never go hungry.”

Children are fascinated with the idea of going out in their back yard, or to an open field or forest, to find that the wild food growing there can be picked, washed, and eaten. They, soon after, become very interested in finding additional wild plants to identify and harvest. They love to help prepare meals that can be served using the foods that they themselves gather. The guide includes a “Rules of Foraging” list and a fun project where you rototill a patch of ground in your yard to just wait and see what springs up naturally to identify, harvest, and eat.

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2020-09-01T08:02:58-06:00Barefoot Gardening/Gourmet Herbalist|

“The Six Laws of Cure”

A Covid-19 Stress-Freedom Primer: It Starts with You!

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
September-October 2020 • Vol 3, No 111

How does the body heal? What steps does it go through? When extrapolated to groups and to society, how do the principles of natural healing give us insight and hope, as we interreact (dance together) and strive to create a better world?

In 2005, Thomas C. Chavez wrote a fascinating book on the entire healing process titled, Body Electronics: Vital Steps for Physical Regeneration, which combines nutrient saturation (through natural, dietary choices and limited supplementation), personal consciousness, and peer support. A seminar leader on these subjects since 1984, he was one of the earliest students of Body Electronics pioneer, Dr. John Whitman Ray. He co-pastors with his wife at Christ the Healer United Church of Christ. He teaches “how to gourmet raw” and has supervised raw catering extravaganzas since 2002.

Chavez entered the world of active health care in 1975 as an Emergency Medical Technician and soon became a student of massage, shiatsu, herbalism, Bach flower remedies, nutrition, and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP). He became a practitioner of homeopathic medicine in 1979. Gabriel Cousens, MD, Director of the Tree of Life Rejuvenation Center, says that Chavez’s work “provides the basis for a complete transformation of body, mind, and spirit.” We will outline here the foundational principles of Chavez’s Six Laws of Cure.

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2020-09-01T08:02:58-06:00Bridging Mental/Physical, Current Events|

Nature’s Purest Water: Watermelon

Just Remember: Eat Them Alone, or Leave Them Alone!

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
July-August 2020 • Vol 3, No 110

Every child remembers summer-fun foods—my favorite was watermelon! When my first child was 8 months old, she grabbed my watermelon rind and started teething on it—her first food! Since then, I have watched and studied for information on these wonderful balls of Mother Nature’s purest water. Here’s a sampling.

Starting in 1979, Dr. N.W. Walker, who wrote Colon Health—The Key to Vibrant Life, states: “The cause of death is colon neglect. Flush it out! Maintain the water balance in your systems. The human body consists of 65% to 70% water. About one gallon is eliminated every 24 hours and must be replenished.”

In 1988, Ann Wigmore, ND, DD, in The Alchemy of Change, wrote: “Watermelon is a real treasure! It is classified as both a fruit and a vegetable. It is the most alkaline of any of them. It provides a great aid for overcoming any acid condition. Considering our present hazardous water conditions, watermelon contains the best natural water.

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Adrenals—Our Fire Element! What Are They?

What Weakens Them? How to Restore Them?
Can STONES Help?

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
March-April 2020 • Vol 3, No 109

The endocrine system is the synergistic interaction of all the glands. It is directly related to our emotional, feeling body and light centers. The adrenal glands are located in the trunk of our body, which in martial arts, is known as the chi or qi area, and our furnace. This gives us our first clue that we’re in the fire element and drinking or eating a lot of cold, icy drinks can put that fire out. In quantum physics (patterns within patterns), it’s the figure-8 flow, as above so below—the Alpha/Omega return current of life’s journeys.

The adrenal glands sit like two tiny pyramids on top of the kidneys, seated on a pad of fat. Simplified, they consist of an outer core and an inner core. The outer core secretes the hormone cortisol, which controls swelling and bacterial, excess heat, also known as inflammation, the precursor to all disease in the body. Along with stress, inflammation is at the core of burned-out adrenals (also known as exhaustion or chronic fatigue). That’s why MDs give cortisone shots.

The inner core of the adrenals releases adrenaline, our jump-start in the morning, and maintains our level of energy all day long. The adrenals are sunlight activated, as all the hormone system is. This gives us our second clue, that sun gazing, used for centuries, is a great way to strengthen, heal and repair your adrenals.

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Eat Your Microgreens!

The Gourmet Herbalist

Marlenea La Shomb, ND, LMT
March-April 2020 • Vol 3, No 109

Looking out at the snow-covered garden and frozen ground, as winter lingers on, I count on my greens to provide me with chlorophyll, known as “liquid sunlight.” I recently had the wonderful opportunity to meet Sam Mascari, owner of Montana Roots in Livingston, and to tour his magical greenhouses. Right before my eyes, I saw what I had previously only read about—an aqua-ponic, recirculating, greenhouse ecosystem! It starts with the tank of fish that provides fertilizer, which is then pumped into a biological filter bed that is rich with worms and beneficial bacteria.

Montana Roots is a year-round, sustainable farm that grows a variety of microgreens, shoots, leafy greens, herbs, and edible flowers. Sam explained to me the difference between sprouts and microgreens. Sprouts, grown in a jar, are more the germinated seeds and the roots; whereas, microgreens are eaten after the first leaves (called cotyledons) emerge from a plant. It grows in soil that is a significant part of the embryo within the seed of a plant. Upon germination, the cotyledon becomes the embryonic first leaves of a seedling, before adult leafing occurs.

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