Catherine Nelson Ph.D. – BBSH / Pathwork

“Nothing Is as It Seems—

Even When You’re Certain!”

Catherine Nelson, Ph.D.
September – October 2021 • Vol 3, No 117

“What does that phrase mean?” asked Lena, as she heard Carol state it. Four women were all sitting at a restaurant table having a cup of coffee. Carol said, “Think about it; it’s happening all the time these days.” Marta spoke up and said, “I know what she means. Several friends of mine were going to come and visit me in September. We get together every year but couldn’t last year because of Covid. We each live in different states. We connected on Zoom in April to make our plans for September.

We decided they would come to my home in Bozeman and then drive to a national park in Canada for several days of hiking. We quickly made reservations for both lodging in Canada and for a local rental car, because we had heard it was going to be a busy summer with lots of tourists.

“Our only concern was about when Canada would open its borders to tourists. I felt certain they would open long before our scheduled visit,” said Marta. “Sure enough, they opened the border in August, but we had a problem. They would only accept tourists who were vaccinated and two of my friends were adamant that they would not get vaccinated.”

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2021-09-07T10:02:39-06:00Mental & Emotional Health|

So What Is on Your List?

Balancing Act: Our Needs vs. Our Loved Ones’

Catherine Nelson, Ph.D.
January – February 2021 • Vol 3, No 113

This question is not about your grocery list or your “TO DO” list. It is a list about you. It may be a list you have yet to make.

Let’s back up a little and first learn about Ruth’s story. She and her parents were in a concentration camp in Germany near the end of World War II. They suffered severe hardship until they were freed by the Allies in 1945. They were poor; they had no savings; they had no home. They had lost all contact with their relatives. Somehow Ruth’s parents found work and received help from different groups.

After they had recovered physically, mentally, and emotionally to some degree, the family made their way to the U.S. and settled in New York City. They worked hard and saved enough money to open a clothing store and a few years later, a clothing factory. Ruth worked long hours beside her parents, but she was grateful. She was safe and free to live her life.

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