Integrated Functional Movement

//Integrated Functional Movement

Integrated Functional Movement

3 Exercises Optimal Biomechanics

Terry Kennedy, MPT
January–February 2019 • Vol 3, No 102

In my previous article, “Addressing Chronic Pain from Suboptimal Biomechanics,” I discussed how our body’s biomechanics and movement patterns (the way we hold ourselves and move), can be altered by old injuries or bad habits, which results in an imbalance of muscle tension. Some muscles become overused and painful; others become weak and often “silent.” The fascia (our three-dimensional web of connective tissue) adapts to the imbalance and contributes to abnormal forces on joints. All this can lead to arthritis. Any component can contribute to chronic pain, and this is often difficult to sort out and treat successfully.

The meanings of the two terms, biomechanics and movement patterns are very similar. Good biomechanics result in good movement patterns. Good functional movement patterns have nerves, muscles, joints and fascia that are working together optimally. With optimal biomechanics and integrated movement patterns, there is the potential to be pain-free, because of less joint compression and better-balanced soft tissue tension.

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2018-12-27T10:08:58+00:00Fitness & Nutrition|