Fitness & Nutrition

/Fitness & Nutrition

Is the Keto Diet Right for You?

Enhancing the Body’s Physiology

Lynn Evans, RN, M.S., CNW
March-April 2019 • Vol 3, No 103

The picture on the left, above, shows me at my heaviest (230 lbs.) in 2001. I was 43 and miserable. I had tried almost every diet that came along. All of them were some version of a low fat/low calorie diet. All seemed to work initially, but none lasted long term. In about 2002, I discovered WestonAPrice.org and was shocked at their message that FAT does not make you fat. I adopted a high-fat, whole-food diet. Many of my physical aliments disappeared, but after about a year, my weight loss stalled. I then learned about the low-carb, high-fat approach, and then I discovered the Keto Diet.

I was probably a diabetic for many years, despite being told by my doctor that I wasn’t, as my labs were “normal.” I was unfortunately told for many years by doctors I trusted that, “I just needed to eat less and exercise more.” I now know this is very bad advice. I’m still a work in progress, but I feel fabulous at 60, and much “younger” than I felt 30 years ago!

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Keeping your Birthday Suit Clean & Healthy

4 Easy Steps to Great Skin

Marlenea La Shomb, N.D., LMT
March-April 2019 • Vol 3, No 103

With the dawning of a new spring, we will want to shed the old layers of skin that have built up over the winter months. Just as a snake sheds its outer layers, elimination is very important to our overall health.

What are your body’s garbage-removal systems? Kidneys remove water waste, bowels eliminate bulk waste, lungs remove toxic gases, and skin (considered a two-way street) breathes in oxygen and releases toxic debris. This happens with rashes, psoriasis and eczema, as well as by sweating, especially where there is an area of concentrated lymph nodes, like the armpits and groin area.

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Spring Into the New Year…

JUST MOVE!

Marlenea La Shomb, N.D., LMT, Certified Reboundologist
January–February 2019 • Vol 3, No 102

Did you know, statistically speaking, that lack of movement is now being considered our number-one cause of disease? Your mitochondria are the key workers in your cells. They need oxygen to do their chores, and they multiply with movement and use. Dr. Jerry Tennant, MD, ND, reminds us that moving the arms activates energy for the lungs and heart. Moving the legs activates and massages all the organs located from the diaphragm and below.

Studies and research have proven that children learn better on their feet and when moving. Getting out and moving in nature, with fresh air and sunshine, is even more beneficial. So get away from that desk and just move!

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Integrated Functional Movement

3 Exercises Optimal Biomechanics

Terry Kennedy, MPT
January–February 2019 • Vol 3, No 102

In my previous article, “Addressing Chronic Pain from Suboptimal Biomechanics,” I discussed how our body’s biomechanics and movement patterns (the way we hold ourselves and move), can be altered by old injuries or bad habits, which results in an imbalance of muscle tension. Some muscles become overused and painful; others become weak and often “silent.” The fascia (our three-dimensional web of connective tissue) adapts to the imbalance and contributes to abnormal forces on joints. All this can lead to arthritis. Any component can contribute to chronic pain, and this is often difficult to sort out and treat successfully.

The meanings of the two terms, biomechanics and movement patterns are very similar. Good biomechanics result in good movement patterns. Good functional movement patterns have nerves, muscles, joints and fascia that are working together optimally. With optimal biomechanics and integrated movement patterns, there is the potential to be pain-free, because of less joint compression and better-balanced soft tissue tension.

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2018-12-27T10:08:58-07:00Fitness & Nutrition|

Celery Is an Herb!

“The Gourmet Herbalist”

Marlenea La Shomb, ND
November-December 2018 • Vol 3, No 101

Celery is one of the most powerful anti-inflammatory foods, because it starves unproductive bacteria, yeast, mold, fungus, and viruses that are present in the body and flushes their toxins and debris out of the intestinal tract and liver. Pathogens like these are so often the underlying cause of inflammation—in their absence, your body is much better able to handle whatever life throws your way. At the same time, celery helps good bacteria thrive.

Above is the opening paragraph on celery, Life-Changing Foods, Save Yourself and the Ones You Love with the Hidden Powers of Fruits and Vegetables, a #1 New York Times bestseller by Anthony William. He is known as the Medical Medium, also being called “the next Edgar Cayce.” Here are just a few highlights of what’s inside this book…

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Addressing Chronic Pain

From Suboptimal Biomechanics

Terry Kennedy, MPT
November-December 2018 • Vol 3, No 101

Chronic pain will visit most of us at some point in our lives. It comes and goes, or is it constantly nagging, despite our efforts to deal with it. A trip to your doctor, and maybe to a specialist, may reveal that nothing is seriously wrong—which is good to know. You might be offered an injection to the painful area or a prescription for physical therapy.

Chronic pain could start from a variety of possibilities such as an old injury that may have occurred years or decades in the past. You have long since dismissed it as irrelevant, since the old injury was in one location and the pain you are now experiencing is in another.

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2018-12-27T10:08:58-07:00Fitness & Nutrition|

What’s Your Face Telling You?

A Picture Paints 1,000 Words

Marlenea La Shomb, ND
September-October 2018 • Vol 3, No 100

In life I have found keeping it simple and finding what works best for you are most beneficial when working to move forward through challenging situations, whether mental, emotional, or physical, since they are all tied together with one affecting the other.

Over the years, I have met some people with a very strong sense of smell and taste, disliking pure essential oils. For that very reason, they can also have a dislike for stronger tasting foods, like raw garlic, onions, lemon, ginger, cayenne or turmeric, herbs and herbal remedies (tinctures), teas and have never gotten used to the benefits due to the taste. Adding to that, some cannot swallow tablets or capsules, making me wonder, what can I recommend to these people that they will actually take?

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Using Chairs & Stairs

For Integrated Movement

Terry Kennedy, MPT
September-October 2018 • Vol 3, No 100

As a physical therapist emphasizing myofascial release and integrated movement, I like to augment my hands-on and exercise treatments with home programs that include foam rollers for soft tissue mobilization, and balls or gadgets to release “knots” in the muscles and fascia. A metal folding chair is another valuable tool for self-treatment. It is indestructible and stores in a closet or behind a door. It is a great value—$15 at your favorite box store.

A person can accomplish multiple stretches and joint range of motion (ROM) from the following pose, using a chair or the lower steps of a stairway: Place one foot on the floor and the other on the seat of the chair and grasp the back of the chair for security. The leg of the lower foot is kept straight, stretching the “gastroc” muscles of the calf and the hip flexors (psoas and company). This also takes the hip and knee into full extension and the ankle into forward bending or dorsiflexion (see first photo, above).

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2018-12-27T10:08:59-07:00Fitness & Nutrition|

Importance of Maintaining an Alkaline Body

Your Body’s pH: What It Is, Why It Matters

Amanda Kimmel & Marlenea La Shomb
July–August 2018 • Vol 3, No 99

Everything we eat affects our health and makes our bodies either more acidic or alkaline. The normal pH of our bodies is supposed to range from 7.35 to 7.45. A pH value of 0 is the most acidic, while 14 is the most alkaline. A pH of 7 is neutral, as it’s in the middle of the scale. The pH of the foods you consume daily play a huge role in weight gain or loss, what your skin looks like, how susceptible you are to disease and illness, and how you feel upon waking every morning.

So what foods cause our bodies to become more acidic or alkaline? Alkaline foods include vegetables, fruits, green tea, seeds, nuts, and beans. The most alkalizing foods are typically dark-green, leafy vegetables, mainly due to their high chlorophyll content. Acidic foods and drinks include meats, dairy, soda, caffeine, alcohol, and sugars. (See foods list here.)

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The Elimination Diet—

Is It Right For You?

Lisa Souba
July–August 2018 • Vol 3, No 99

Has your world been challenged by the need to eliminate certain foods from your diet? When you go out to eat, do you often say, or hear someone else say, “I can’t have that”? I’ve been there, and I get your frustration. I remember the day when my health-care provider told me to go gluten-, wheat-, dairy-, and sugar-free! I remember sitting at the bookstore looking at cookbooks trying to figure out how to cook.

I love food and I love to cook, but this change challenged me. I had no idea where to begin or what to do. Fast forward six years and I’ve figured it out. I can now enjoy all those things again because I treated my digestive health and made some lifestyle changes. Unfortunately, we’ve succumbed to the new age of The Elimination Diet.

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2018-07-05T15:06:40-07:00Fitness & Nutrition|